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Category/Programming-language/lisp

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lisp (29)



ACDK
ACDK is a development framework with a similar target of Microsoft's .NET or Sun's ONE platform, but instead of using Basic/C# or Java as programming language, it bases C++ as core implementation language. ACDK implements the standard library packages, including acdk::lang, acdk::lang::reflect, acdk::util, acdk::io, acdk::text (including regexpr), acdk::net, acdk::sql, acdk::xml and more, as well as technologies like flexible Allocator/Garbage Collection, Threading and Unicode. With the extensions of ACDK C++ objects are available for reflection, serialization, aspect oriented class attributes and [D]ynamic [M]ethod [I]nvocation. This DMI act as an universal object oriented call interface to connect C++ with scripting languages (Java, Perl, Tcl, Python, Lisp, Visual Basic, VBScript) and standard component technologies (CORBA, COM+).

ACL2
ACL2 is a mathematical logic and a mechanical theorem prover to help you reason in the logic (which is a subset of applicative Common Lisp). The theorem prover is an ``industrial strength version of the Boyer-Moore theorem prover, Nqthm. Users can build models of all kinds of computing systems in ACL2, just as in Nqthm, even though the formal logic is Lisp. Once you've built an ACL2 model of a system, you can run it and use ACL2 to prove theorems about the model.

CMUCL
CMUCL is a free, high performance implementation of the Common Lisp programming language which runs on most major Unix platforms. It mainly conforms to the ANSI Common Lisp standard. CMUCL provides a sophisticated native code compiler; a powerful foreign function interface; an implementation of CLOS, the Common Lisp Object System; which includes multimethods and a metaobject protocol; a source-level debugger and code profiler; and an Emacs-like editor implemented in Common Lisp.

Cl-ana
cl-ana is a library of modular utilities for reasonably high performance data analysis & visualization using Common Lisp. (Reasonably means I have to be able to use it for analyzing particle accelerator data). The library is made of various sublibraries and is designed in a very bottom-up way so that if you don't care about some feature you don't have to load it.

The functionality support so far are

  • Tabular data analysis: Read-write of large datasets stored in HDF5 files are supported, along with ntuple datasets, CSVs, and in-memory data tables. Users can add their own table types by defining 4 methods and extending the table CLOS type.
  • Histograms: Binned data analysis is supported with both contiguous and sparse histogram types; functional interface is provided via map (which allows reduce/fold) and filter.
  • Plotting: Uses gnuplot for plotting dataset samples, plain-old lisp functions, histograms, strings-as-formulae, and anything else the user wishes to add via methods on a couple of generics.
  • Fitting: Uses GSL for non-linear least squares fitting. Uses plain-old lisp functions as the fit functions and can fit against dataset samples, histograms, and whatever the user adds.
  • Generic mathematics: CL doesn't provide extendable math functions, so cl-ana provides these as well as a convenient mechanism (a single function) for using these functions instead of the non-extendable versions. Already included are error propogation and quantities (values with units, e.g. 5 meters) as well as a GNU Octave-style handling of sequences (e.g. (+ (1 2) (3 4)) --> (4 6)).

Clisp Heckert gnu.small.png
ANSI Common Lisp is a high-level, general-purpose programming language. GNU CLISP is a Common Lisp implementation by Bruno Haible of Karlsruhe University and Michael Stoll of Munich University, both in Germany. It mostly supports the Lisp described in the ANSI Common Lisp standard. It runs on most GNU and Unix systems (GNU/Linux, GNU/Hurd, FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, Solaris, Tru64, HP-UX, BeOS, IRIX, AIX, Mac OS X and others) and on other systems and needs only 4 MB of RAM. The user interface comes in English, German, French, Spanish, Dutch, Russian and Danish, and can be changed during run time. GNU CLISP includes an interpreter, a compiler, a debugger, CLOS, MOP, a foreign language interface, a socket interface, i18n, fast bignums, arbitrary precision floats and more. An X11 interface is available through CLX, Garnet, CLUE/CLIO. GNU CLISP runs Maxima, ACL2 and many other Common Lisp packages.

Common Lisp SQL
'CLSQL' is an SQL database interface for Common Lisp. It provides object-oriented and functional access methods to the underlying database, which can be one of MySQL, ODBC, PostgreSQL, or SQLite. It uses the Unified Foreign Function Interface (UFFI) and thus supports the CMU Common Lisp, Steel Bank Common Lisp, Allegro Common Lisp, OpenMCL, and Lispworks implementations.

Dismal Heckert gnu.small.png
Dismal (Dis' Mode Ain't Lotus) is a major mode for GNU Emacs that implements a spreadsheet. It is designed to be keystroke driven rather than mouse/menu driven (although it can be menu driven), and it is extensible. Users can write their own commands and functions, for example, to allow a function cell to write to several nearby cells. A ruler can be put up that reflects the semantics of column names past the ones automatically provided as letters.

Dismal has some useful functions that implement the keystroke level model of Card, Moran, and Newell.

Doxymacs
'doxymacs' is an elisp package designed to make using and creating Doxygen easier for Emacs users. It can look up documentation for classes, functions, members, etc in the browser of your choice, fontify Doxygen keywords, and automagically insert Doxygen comments in JavaDoc, Qt, or C++ style. You can also create your own style via templates.

ECB
'ECB' is a source code browser for Emacs. It displays windows that can be used to browse directories, files, and file contents like methods and variables. It supports source code parsing for languages like Java, C, C++, Elisp, Scheme, Perl, TeX, LaTeX, etc. It also offers an (optional) permanent "compile window" at the bottom of the emacs frame, which displays all help and compile output. The rest of the frame is called the "edit area", which can be divided into several edit windows that are used for editing the sources. Deleting some of the edit windows neither destroys the compile window nor the browsing windows.

Elib
Elib is designed as a collection of useful routines that don't have to be reinvented each time a new program is written. It contains code for container data structures, minibuffer and string handling functions missing in standard Emacs, and routines for handling lists of cookies in a buffer. This project was a GNU package. It has since been decommissioned and is no longer developed.

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