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Autodist
'Autodist' is a source distribution management system that lets users define what is included in and excluded from a distribution and what license is used. It is especially targeted at large software projects that create multiple distributions from a source tree. Autodist supports distribution management in directory, file, and file content level, and automatic relicensing of a distribution. Please note that Autodist is not a binary packaging system. It is specifically used to create source distributions. A binary packaging system, however can be hooked to the distribution creation process, if needed.
Autogen Heckert gnu.tiny.png
'AutoGen' generates program files that contain repetitive text with varied substitutions. It simplifies the maintenance of programs with large amounts of repetitive text, which is useful if several blocks of such text must be synchronized. It includes:
  • AutoOpts - automates the handling of command line, environment and config file options, including usage text, man pages, and the invoking section of an info doc
  • getdefs - extracts AutoGen definitions from stylized comments embedded in source code
  • columns - tabularizes lists for improved output appearance
  • AutoXDR - NFSv4 specifies that its remote procedure calls be batched. AutoGen generates the code for marshalling and unmarshalling the arguments on both sides of the RPC request
  • AutoFSM - produces a transition table and prototype finite state machine where it is possible to determine a state transition type (token code) without reference to the current state
  • xml2ag - lets AutoGen use any XML file as if it were a set of AutoGen definitions
Automake Heckert gnu.tiny.png
'Automake' automatically generates make files compliant with the GNU coding standards. It was inspired by the 4.4 BSD make and include files, but aims to be portable and to conform to the GNU standards for Make file variables and targets. The input files are called Makefile.am; the output files are called Makefile.in. They are intended for use with autoconf. Automake requires certain things to be done in your configure.in. This package also includes the "aclocal' program, which generates an 'aclocal.m4' based on the contents of 'configure.in.' It is useful as an extensible, maintainable mechanism for augmenting autoconf.
Autopackage
'autopackage' builds packages that will run on different distros. These packages support both graphical and terminal frontends, support dependency checking and resolution, and use deep desktop integration. Tools to enhance the packaged software such as binreloc and relaytool are also included . By providing an autopackage, developers ensure that users always have an easy way of installing the latest release of their software.
Bitten
Bitten is a Python-based framework for collecting various software metrics via continuous integration. It builds on Trac to provide an integrated web-based user interface.
BuildBot
Automates the compile/test cycle required by most software projects to validate code changes. It builds and tests the tree each time a change is committed, providing status updates through a Web page or other protocols.
Buildtool
Buildtool is a set of integrated utilities which make programs more portable and easier to build on any kind of *nix-like system. It simplifies the build process of a program from user's point of view, by automatically configuring the source code with specific details of the host system; it also makes developer's work easier because all Makefile complexity is hidden and behavior is homogenized.
CMake
CMake is a cross-platform build system. It is used to control the software compilation process using simple platform and compiler independent configuration files. It generates native Makefiles and workspaces that can be used in the compiler environment of your choice. CMake is quite sophisticated: it is possible to support complex environments requiring system configuration, pre-processor generation, and code generation.
Ccbuild
'ccbuild' is like a dynamic Makefile: it finds all programs in the current directory (containing "int main") and compiles them. To do this, it reads the C++ sources and looks at all local and global includes. All C++ files around local includes are considered objects for the main program. The global includes lead to extra compiler arguments using a configuration file. ccbuild splits these arguments for compilation and linking, keeping the linking arguments back for later use. It should allow development without any scripting and only simple reusable configuration. 'ccbuild' can also create simple Makefiles and graph dependencies using DOT (graphviz) graphs.
Checkstyle
Checkstyle is a development tool to help programmers write Java code that adheres to a coding standard. It automates the process of checking Java code to spare humans this boring (but important) task. This makes it ideal for projects that want to enforce a coding standard. Checkstyle is highly configurable and can be made to support almost any coding standard. An example configuration file is supplied supporting the Sun Code Conventions. As well, other sample configuration files are supplied for other well known conventions. Checkstyle can check many aspects of your source code. Historically it's main functionality has been to check code layout issues, but since the internal architecture was changed in version 3, more and more checks for other purposes have been added. Now Checkstyle provides checks that find class design problems, duplicate code, or bug patterns like double checked locking.


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