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CVSHistory
CVSHistory is a Web-based tool for browsing CVS activity. It integrates with ViewCVS or CVSweb, supports sorting, range selection, and regular expession-based searching, and works with any CGI-capable Web server.
CVSSearch
CVSSearch searches for code fragments using CVS comments. Since a CVS comment describes the lines of code involved in the commit and that this description will typically hold for many future versions. CVSSearch lets you to better search and understand the most recent version of the code by looking at previous versions. For each line of code in the most recent version, we build a profile consisting of all CVS comments that involved that line in past commits. This profile is used not only to search the most recent version of the code but also to understand what the code does --- including its motivation and history.
CVSTrac
CVSTrac implements a low-ceremony Web-based bug and patch-set tracking system for use with CVS. Features include automatic changelog generation, repository change history browsing, user-defined bug database queries, Wiki pages, and Web-based administration of the CVSROOT/passwd file. CVSTrac operates either as CGI or as its own Web server. It automatically generates a patch-set log from CVS check-in comments, and includes a built-in repository browser. It is simple to setup and has minimal memory, disk and CPU requirements, so it runs effectively on old hardware. Access permissions are separately configurable for each user, and anonymous users are allowed. Since the program uses a built-in SQL database engine (SQLite), no external RDBMS is required.
CVSps
CVSps is a program for generating 'patchset' information from a CVS repository. A patchset is defined as a set of changes made to a collection of files, and all committed at the same time (using a single 'cvs commit' command). This helps you see the big picture of the evolution of a cvs project. You can see the history of committed patchsets, restrict by author, date range, files affected, branches affected. The program can also generate a diff of a given patchset. It essentially gives you the equivalent of tagging before and after each commit.
Ccvssh
'ccvssh' is an external program called by cvs (via the :ext: method) which connects to remote CVS pservers through an SSL connection to a stunnel daemon. It is a reimplementation of 'cvssh' in C, and is fast and easy to use.
Cervisia
Cervisia is a graphical frontend for the CVS version control system. It runs with any window manager or desktop environment (not just KDE). Features include:
  • Update or retrieve the status of a working directory or single files
  • Importing into the repository
  • Diff against the repository and between different revisions
  • Annotated view of files
  • See log messages in tree and list form.
  • Conflict resolution in a file
  • Tagging, branching
  • Updating to a branch/date
  • Changelog editor
  • Command to see the last change in a file
Cl2html
'cl2html' converts a CVS log into chronological HTML output to give an overview of the CVS activities in a project. HTML output can include links to sources and patches, using viewcvs.cgi.
Colorsvn
colorsvn is a Subversion output colorizer. It was extracted from kde-sdk, and was extended with build process and configuration.
Cssc Heckert gnu.tiny.png
CSSC is the GNU project's replacement for the traditional Unix SCCS suite. It aims for full compatibility (including precise nuances of behaviour, support for all command-line options, and in most cases bug-for-bug compatibility) and comes with an extensive automated test suite. If you currently use SCCS for version control, you should be able to just drop in CSSC, even if you have a large number of shell scripts which are layered on top of SCCS and depend on it. This will let you to develop on and for GNU/Linux if your source code exists only in an SCCS repository. CSSC also lets you migrate to a more modern version control system.
Cvs
Version control system and important component of Source Configuration Management (SCM). Lets you record the history of source files and documents. It's similar to the free software RCS, PRCS, and Aegis programs, but has the following significant advantages over RCS:
  • runs user scripts to log operations or enforce site-specific policies
  • lets separatedevelopers operate as a team
  • vendor branches keep versions separate, but also merge them if needed
  • unreserved checkouts let developers work simultaneously on the same files
  • flexible modules database maps names to the components of a larger database
  • runs on most Unix variants; clients for Windows 95/NT, OS/2, and VMS available


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