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Ccache
'Ccache' is a fast compiler cache. It acts as a caching pre-processor to C/C++ compilers, using the -E compiler switch and a hash to detect when a compilation can be satisfied from cache. When the same code is compiled again the cached output is used, giving a significant speedup (typically 5x). You can also create symbolic links from your compiler's name to ccache; this lets you use ccache without any changes to your build system. 'Ccache' produces the same output that the real compiler would, including the same object files and compiler warnings that the real compiler would produce. The only way to tell you are using ccache is the speed.
Chicken
CHICKEN is a simple Scheme-to-C compiler supporting the language features as defined in the 'Revised^5 Report on Scheme'. It supports full tail-recursion and first-class continuations. The code it generates is quite portable; compiled files generated by it (including itself) should work with either no or minor changes on other systems. Linking to C modules and C library functions is straightforward, and compiled programs can easily be embedded into existing C code. The package includes many extra libraries.
Cim Heckert gnu.tiny.png
GNU cim offers a class concept, separate compilation with full type checking, interface to external C routines, an application package for process simulation and a coroutine concept. The portability of the GNU Simula Compiler is based on the C programming language. The compiler and the run-time system is written in C, and the compiler produces C code, that is passed to a C compiler for further processing towards machine code.
Clisp Heckert gnu.tiny.png
ANSI Common Lisp is a high-level, general-purpose programming language. GNU CLISP is a Common Lisp implementation by Bruno Haible of Karlsruhe University and Michael Stoll of Munich University, both in Germany. It mostly supports the Lisp described in the ANSI Common Lisp standard. It runs on most GNU and Unix systems (GNU/Linux, GNU/Hurd, FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, Solaris, Tru64, HP-UX, BeOS, IRIX, AIX, Mac OS X and others) and on other systems and needs only 4 MB of RAM. The user interface comes in English, German, French, Spanish, Dutch, Russian and Danish, and can be changed during run time. GNU CLISP includes an interpreter, a compiler, a debugger, CLOS, MOP, a foreign language interface, a socket interface, i18n, fast bignums, arbitrary precision floats and more. An X11 interface is available through CLX, Garnet, CLUE/CLIO. GNU CLISP runs Maxima, ACL2 and many other Common Lisp packages.
Cloudgizer
Cloudgizer is a tool for building web applications as Apache modules in C language enhanced with simple markup, with emphasis on performance, small-footprint, and more productive and safer programming in C. It combines the ease of scripting with the power of C, improving the resource utilization for cloud applications. The programmer writes simple markup language mixed with C code, which is then translated entirely into C code and compiled natively as Apache module. The resulting application is fast and takes less memory, as there are no interpreters or virtual machines. Features include easy markups to use MariaDB database, HTML input parameters, cookies, simpler outputting of web pages, files storage and manipulation, encryption, encoding, program execution, web calls, safer and easier string manipulation etc. - the list is too long to place in one sentence. Overall Cloudgizer does a lot of stuff for you that you'd otherwise need to do yourself. A memory garbage collection system and memory overwrite/underwrite detection comes in handy for program stability. The same goes for string and memory handling markups to help write applications that won't crash. Also included is an application packaging system and an automated application installer. This makes rollout of products and release cycle more manageable. Cloudgizer source files have extension .v. Cloudgizer pre-compiler (cld program) will turn your .v files into .c files, ready for compilation as pure C programs. Then, your program will be compiled and linked with Apache web server on RH/Centos systems. It links with Apache as an Apache module in a "prefork" configuration. It does the work of communicating with Apache, and it makes it easier to write high-performance/small-footprint web programs in C. Cloudgizer is not designed to be thread-safe as it works in a "prefork" configuration of Apache. You can also build command-line programs. The same program can serve as both command-line utility and a web program linked with Apache. Cloudgizer works with RedHat/Centos 7 operating system, Apache web server and mariaDB database.
Compilercache
'Compilercache' is a wrapperscript around your C and C++ compilers. Each time you compile something, it puts the result into a cache. If you compile the same thing again, the result will be picked from the cache instead of being recompiled. The same applies if you change your compiler options: the old compilation is picked up from the cache, which speeds things up considerably. No Makefiles, no cleaning up dependencies, and no recompilation if you switch compiler options. Additionally, if you download an updated version of a package already on your system and compile it using compilercache, only the changed sources will be recompiled.
Cpphs
'cpphs' is a simplified Haskell re-implementation of cpp, the C pre-processor, in Haskell. The C pre-processor is widely used in Haskell source code, but a true cpp is not often available on some systems, and the common cpp provided by the gcc 3.x series is changing in ways that are incompatible with Haskell's syntax. This includes problems with, for instance, string gaps, and prime characters in identifiers. This project attempts to provide an alternative to cpp that is more compatible with Haskell and can be distributed with compilers.
Distcc
'distcc' distributes compilation of C or C++ code across several machines on a network. It should always generate the same results as a local compile, is simple to install and use, and is often significantly faster than a local compile. 'distcc' does not require all machines to share a filesystem, have synchronized clocks, or to have the same libraries or header files installed. Machines can be running different operating systems, as long as they have compatible binary formats or cross-compilers. 'distcc' sends the complete preprocessed source code across the network for each job, so all it requires of the volunteer machines is that they be running the distccd daemon, and that they have an appropriate compiler installed.
Dparser
'DParser' is a scannerless GLR parser generator based on the Tomita algorithm. It is self-hosted and very easy to use. Grammars are written in a natural style of EBNF and regular expressions and support both speculative and final actions.
Eli
Eli is a domain-specific programming environment formed by combining a collection of tools that implement powerful compiler construction strategies. In this environment, you can automatically generate complete language implementations from application-oriented specifications. Implementations can be either interpretive and used to invoke the operations of an existing system, or involve translation into an arbitrary target language. Eli has been used to produce translators, program generators, analysers, and interpreters. The user describes the problems that must besolved, and Eli automatically employs the tools and components needed for particular problem.
Emacs Common Lisp
Emacs Common Lisp is an implementation of Common Lisp, written in Emacs Lisp. The implementation provides a Common Lisp environment, separate from Emacs Lisp, running in Emacs. It does not intend to extend Emacs Lisp with Common Lisp functionality; however, Emacs Lisp functions can call Common Lisp functions and vice versa.
F2c
Fortran 77 compiler based on the original Unix f77 compiler, with the backend replaced by a C code generator.
Free Oberon
Free Oberon is a cross-platform IDE for development in Oberon programming language made in the classical FreePascal-like pseudo-graphic style. Compilation of user-written programs is performed using the Vishap Oberon Compiler and then GCC. The compiled console programs can be run in the built-in terminal emulator.
Freebasic
FreeBASIC is a compiler for the FreeBASIC programming language, a dialect of BASIC which is partially compatible with Microsoft QuickBASIC. It makes use of the GNU binutils and can compile itself.
Freepascal
FreePascal (aka FPK Pascal) is a 32 and 64 bit bit Pascal compiler with extensions for different processors and operating systems. It tries to stay compatible with the dialects of well known proprietary Pascal-based compilers, so you don't have to learn much to switch to free software and/or systems. The language syntax is semantically compatible with TP 7.0 as well as most versions of Delphi (classes, rtti, exceptions, ansistrings). FreePascal supports function overloading, operator overloading and other such features. It also comes with several command-line tools to help your programming, including a source formatter, a makefile generator, a C header translator, a unit dependency lister and even TP lex and yacc. FreePascal comes with its own development environment (not for all platforms yet).
Frost
Frost is a compiler wrapper which makes it possible to use functions with virtual arguments and multi methods in C++ programs as if they were a native feature.
G++
g++ is the traditional nickname of GNU C++, a freely redistributable C++ compiler. It is part of gcc, the GNU compiler suite, and is currently part of that distribution.
  • Decommissioned note:
g++ is now fully integrated in GCC
G77 Heckert gnu.tiny.png
GNU Fortran compiler.
GDL
The Gnu Data Language (GDL) is a free alternative to the data visualization and analysis tool, called IDL (Interactive Data Language), frequently used by scientists. GDL and its library routines are designed as a tool for numerical data analysis and visualisation. GDL is dynamically typed, vectorized and has object-oriented programming capabilities. The library routines handle numerical calculations, data visualisation, signal/image processing, file input/output (incl. graphical and scientific data formats such as TIFF, PNG, netCDF, HDF etc) and interaction with host OS. Despite its name, GDL is not a GNU package.
Gcc Heckert gnu.tiny.png
GCC is the GNU Compiler Collection. It provides compiler front-ends for several languages, including C, C++, Objective-C, Fortran, Java, Ada, and Go. It also includes runtime support libraries for these languages. GCC provides many levels of source code error checking traditionally provided by other tools (such as lint), produces debugging information, and can perform many different optimizations to the resulting object code. The GNU Compiler for Java is now integrated and supported: GCJ can compile Java source or Java bytecodes to either native code or Java class files. Java programs will run faster while letting users run a completely free system without needing a proprietary Java compiler. GCC supports many different architectures and operating systems.


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