Category/Library/Image-processing

From Free Software Directory
 
Jump to: navigation, search

Broaden your selection: Category/Library

Category/Library Search icon.png

Image-processing (17)



BRL-CAD
BRL-CAD includes an interactive geometry editor, parallel ray-tracing support for rendering and geometric analysis, path-tracing for realistic image synthesis, network distributed framebuffer support, image-processing and signal-processing tools.
FLIF
FLIF is a novel lossless image format which outperforms existing image formats in terms of compression ratio. It works well on any kind of image (photographic, line art, computer graphics, etc.) and also supports animations. FLIF images (or animations) can be progressively decoded, which makes the format potentially very suitable for responsive web design. This is the reference implementation of FLIF, which includes a command-line tool (flif) to convert between FLIF and PNG/PNM/PAM, a decoding library (libflif_dec), an encoding library (libflif_enc), some scripts (gif2flif, apng2flif, raw2flif, ...), and a simple image/animation viewer (viewflif).
GDL
The Gnu Data Language (GDL) is a free alternative to the data visualization and analysis tool, called IDL (Interactive Data Language), frequently used by scientists. GDL and its library routines are designed as a tool for numerical data analysis and visualisation. GDL is dynamically typed, vectorized and has object-oriented programming capabilities. The library routines handle numerical calculations, data visualisation, signal/image processing, file input/output (incl. graphical and scientific data formats such as TIFF, PNG, netCDF, HDF etc) and interaction with host OS. Despite its name, GDL is not a GNU package.
Guetzli
Guetzli is known to be very resource intensive, requiring several orders of magnitude more processing time than other JPEG encoders, and a lot of memory. Guetzli supports only the top of JPEG's quality range (quantizer settings 84–100) and supports only sequential (non-"progressive") encoding. Guetzli is more effective with bigger files. Guetzli uses methods to optimize compression efficiency that target mainly the quantization step. It constructs custom quantization tables for each file, decides on color subsampling, and quantizes some adjacent DCT coefficients to zero, balancing benefits in the run-length encoding of coefficients and preservation of perceived image fidelity. Zeroing the right coefficients is the most effective tool in Guetzli, which is used as a makeshift means of spatially adaptive quantization. The optimizations are guided by Butteraugli. It is implemented as a command-line tool in C++.
Guile-cv Heckert gnu.tiny.png

Guile-CV
Image Processing and Analysis in Guile
a Computer Vision functional programming library
Guile-CV is based on Vigra (Vision with Generic Algorithms), enhanced with additional algorithms (Image Textures, Delineate, Reconstruction and many more), all accessible through a nice, clean and easy to use high level API.
Guile-CV is natively multi-threaded, and takes advantage of multiple cores, using high-level and fine grained application-level parallelism constructs available in Guile, based on its support to POSIX threads.
ImageJ
ImageJ is a public domain Java image processing program inspired by NIH Image for the Macintosh. It runs, either as an online applet or as a downloadable application, on any computer with a Java 1.4 or later virtual machine.
KiCad
KiCad is electronic design automation (EDA) software made for designing schematics of electronic circuits and printed circuit boards (PCB). KiCad is developed by the KiCad Developers Team, and features an integrated environment with schematic capture, bill of materials list, PCB layout and much more. KiCad is cross-platform, written with WxWidgets and runs on FreeBSD, Linux, Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X. A lot of component libraries are available. Also migrating tools for components are available (from other EDA software tools). File formats are plain text and well documented, which is good for CVS or Subversion and to make automated component generation scripts. Multiple languages are supported, such as English, Portuguese, Spanish, Czech, Polish, French, German, and Russian. The 3D PCB viewer use 3D model from Wings3D CAD.
Libgd
LibGD is a code library for the dynamic creation of images by programmers. LibGD is written in C, and "wrappers" are available for Perl, PHP and other languages. LibGD can read and write many different image formats. LibGD is commonly used to generate charts, graphics, thumbnails, and most anything else, on the fly. The most common applications of LibGD involve website development, although it can be used with any standalone application!
Libjpeg
This package implements a JPEG codec (encoding and decoding) alongside various utilities for handling JPEG data. It is written in C and distributed as free software together with its source code under the terms of a custom permissive (BSD-like) free software license. The original variant is maintained and published by the Independent JPEG Group (IJG). Provision is made for supporting all variants of these processes, although some uncommon parameter settings aren't implemented yet. There has been no provision for supporting the hierarchical or lossless processes defined in the standard. A set of library routines is provided for reading and writing JPEG image files, plus two sample applications "cjpeg" and "djpeg", which use the library to perform conversion between JPEG and some other popular image file formats. The library is intended to be reused in other applications. In order to support file conversion and viewing software, there is considerable functionality beyond the bare JPEG coding/decoding capability; for example, the color quantization modules are not strictly part of JPEG decoding, but they are essential for output to colormapped file formats or colormapped displays. These extra functions can be compiled out of the library if not required for a particular application. There is also "jpegtran", a utility for lossless transcoding between different JPEG processes, and "rdjpgcom" and "wrjpgcom", two simple applications for inserting and extracting textual comments in JFIF files.

Forks

Libjpeg-turbo
libjpeg-turbo is a fork of libjpeg that uses SIMD instructions (MMX, SSE2, AVX2, Neon, AltiVec) to accelerate baseline JPEG compression and decompression on x86, x86-64, Arm, and PowerPC systems, as well as progressive JPEG compression on x86 and x86-64 systems. On such systems, libjpeg-turbo is generally 2-6x as fast as libjpeg, all else being equal. On other types of systems, libjpeg-turbo can still outperform libjpeg by a significant amount, by virtue of its highly-optimized Huffman coding routines. In many cases, the performance of libjpeg-turbo rivals that of proprietary high-speed JPEG codecs. libjpeg-turbo implements both the traditional libjpeg API as well as the less powerful but more straightforward TurboJPEG API. libjpeg-turbo also features colorspace extensions that allow it to compress from/decompress to 32-bit and big-endian pixel buffers (RGBX, XBGR, etc.), as well as a full-featured Java interface. libjpeg-turbo was originally based on libjpeg/SIMD, an MMX-accelerated derivative of libjpeg v6b developed by Miyasaka Masaru. The TigerVNC and VirtualGL projects made numerous enhancements to the codec in 2009, and in early 2010, libjpeg-turbo spun off into an independent project, with the goal of making high-speed JPEG compression/decompression technology available to a broader range of users and developers.

... further results



Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.3 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the page “GNU Free Documentation License”.

The copyright and license notices on this page only apply to the text on this page. Any software or copyright-licenses or other similar notices described in this text has its own copyright notice and license, which can usually be found in the distribution or license text itself.