Category/Protocol/irc

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irc (16)



Ambassador
Ambassador is a fork of the ChatZilla IRC client built upon the Unified XUL Platform. It features a simple, straighforward interface with a number of options for customization and extensibility. It is available as an add-on compatible with other applications built upon UXP, and as a stand-alone package that can be installed and run independently of a browser.
HexChat
HexChat is an IRC client based on XChat 2, featuring:
  • Easy to use and customizable interface
  • Cross-platform on Windows, OS X, and Unix-like OSes
  • Highly scriptable with Python and Perl
  • Translated in multiple languages
  • Multi-network with auto-connect, join, and identify
  • Spellcheck, proxies, SASL, DCC support and more
Hybridbot
This bot acts as a normal user inside both a IRC channel and a XMPP MUC room, and relays/resends the messages received in one end to the other automatically.
Irc
This library is intended to encapsulate the IRC protocol at a quite low level. It provides an event-driven IRC client framework. It has a fairly thorough support for the basic IRC protocol, CTCP and DCC connections.
Ircxy
IRCXY IRCv4 Implementation
Kirc
Kirc is a lightweight, terminal/console IRC client. It is designed to be compatible with all POSIX-compliant operating systems (including GNU/Linux). Kirc has no dependencies, only requiring a C99 compiler (such as GCC) and POSIX C header files to be built. Instead of having commands specific to itself, Kirc allows users to send raw IRC commands to the server it is connected to. Kirc has basic Emacs-style keybindings for text entry. Whilst mostly minimalistic in nature, Kirc has features such as chat history logging, terminal colours and SASL authentication. Kirc does not support TLS encryption; the developer suggests using a program like Stunnel or Socat to encapsulate the IRC connection within an encrypted 'tunnel'.
KiwiIRC
KiwiIRC makes Web IRC easy. A hand-crafted IRC client that you can enjoy. Designed to be used easily and freely.
Libslack
Libslack is a library of general utilities designed to make UNIX/C programming a bit easier on the eye. It was originally implemented as part of the daemon program. It is a small library with lots of functionality and is accurately documented and thoroughly tested. Good library naming conventions are not rigorously observed on the principle that common operations should always be easy to write and code should always be easy to read.
NgIRCd
ngIRCd is a free, portable and lightweight Internet Relay Chat server for small or private networks, developed under the GNU General Public License (GPL). The server is quite easy to configure, can handle dynamic IP addresses, and optionally supports IDENT, IPv6 connections, SSL-protected links, and PAM for user authentication as well as character set conversion for legacy clients. The server has been written from scratch and is not based on the "forefather", the daemon of the IRCNet. The name ngIRCd means next-generation IRC daemon, which is a little bit exaggerated: lightweight Internet Relay Chat server most probably would have been a better name :-)
Puszcza-guppy
A modular cross-platform chat bot in Python. She performs automated functions at live chat networks. guppy currently serves some common tasks like calculation, web search, words and domain look-up.

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